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CAD $6.41

Jesus On Extasy. No Gods. CD.

SKU:
AOF100
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In stock.

Product Description

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Jesus On Extasy’s rollercoaster career has left its marks on the vocalist who, together with co-founder Chai Deveraux, embarked in 2005 on the mission of packaging suffering & love into digital rock songs. To this end, the two brothers-in-spirit have not simply cross-bred synthesizers and e-guitars; too many industrial rock acts have bluntly dragged staccato riffs across retro drum machines over the decades. JOE, on the other hand, have expanded the range of their genre with the realisation that inner strife, heartache and catchy tunes do not have to be excluded from synthetic rock music – after all, a good helping of glamour has never done anybody any harm. “You have an unbelievable wealth of sonic options if you blend both instrumental worlds,” production genius Chai describes the hybrid approach of these contemporary rockers. “This combination can create a lot of depth without killing off that rock feel.” Sound fetishism alone isn’t enough for limelight hogger Dorian: “And anyway, synthesizers lend themselves just as much to being smashed as guitars. Perhaps even more.”

Track Listing

After Jesus On Extasy had shared the stage with other antichrist superstars such as Marilyn Manson, Project Pitchfork, Tool and Skinny Puppy, mesmerised the M’Era Luna Festival and performed at Oberhausen’s sold-out Königs-Pilsener-Arena, “the danger of losing touch with reality was great,” Dorian confesses today. “You feel like a giant rock star and people adore you. But make no mistake: we’re no heroes!” The digital dandies have returned to planet Earth after their exhilaration waned, informing their fans of this fact in the title track of their third album, “No Gods”. “Don’t wait for me, ’cause I can’t show you heaven,” begs the beau in the chorus. “There were real rock stars around in the 1970s and 80s, those people were gods. These days, a lot of people may be adored or cast as rock stars, but they’re not.” Dorian pays tribute to one of the idols of his adolescence on “Movie Star”: “’Lost Boys’ actor Corey Haim died this year. I was very touched by his fate. Fame practically gnawed away at him.” “He’s dead but no one cares,” – an example which taught him